Subject: Equality

  • Is a Meritocracy Really What We Want?

    "Together we can break down all the barriers holding our families … back. We can build ladders of opportunity … so every single American can have that chance to live up to his or her God-given potential.  Then and only…

  • Rich Neighborhood in NYC Actually Gets a “Noxious” Use

    A core environmental justice fight has long been the fair distribution of necessary nuisance uses throughout a city. Poor neighborhoods tend to be over-burdened with unpleasant parts of public infrastructure like bus depots and sewage plants, with cumulative negative effects…

  • Solar for the People

    So this story started off sounding so promising. An affordable housing complex put solar panels on its roof! Also, it's affordable "community solar," meaning you can invest in a piece of it for $150 (instead of, say, $10K to buy…

  • Income Is How You Get Out of Poverty, Assets Are How You Stay Out

    In Tuesday night’s State of the Union address, President Obama laid out a vision for rebuilding the middle class with pathways to the middle class for lower-income families. But to manifest this vision, we need a much stronger focus on…

  • Homegrown Solutions To Inequity in Ferguson and Beyond

    The debate about Ferguson continues: The grand jury decision is unfair to many; policing practices seem discriminatory and dangerous; and local court systems have been shown to prey upon low-income people. The sheer scope of the problems can be overwhelming.…

  • “Inequality Happens?” Hopefully Not

    In a recent Rooflines post, Sarah Treuhaft holds up new, reputable data that finds that inequality is not a circumstance of economic success, after all, but that it actually has a dampening effect. Specifically, the widening gap between the poor…

  • Attitude Reflects Leadership

    Recently I was honored to receive the Ned Gramlich Award for Responsible Finance during the Opportunity Finance Network (OFN) Conference in Denver. To be recognized by the national association of investors dedicated to aligning capital with justice was a humbling…

  • Regions Can’t Live By Oxygen Alone

    Jack Jensen, an affordable housing and green builder in Ithaca, N.Y., is grumpy about Smart Growth. Specifically, he's pissed off at the assumption that urban infill preserves green space. As  he wrote in his post on "oxygen-based development" on Friday:…

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    Toward a Politics of Love: Thoughts for Pride Month

    During the closing plenary of our recent National Convention, Alex Tom from the Chinese Progressive Association (CPA), when talking about the future of the field of community development and of the AAPI movement(s), said that many youth his organization works…

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    How Will We Care For This Overlooked Population?

    As I’ve discussed in a previous blog post, rural America is aging faster than the rest of the country. Delving a little deeper into some of the characteristics of this population can provide insights. One thing that has especially stood…

  • Watching This Movie is an Act of Patriotism

    Since I concluded my book review of Joseph Stiglitz’s The Price of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangers Our Future with a quote from former secretary of labor Robert Reich, I thought I would take an unpaid furlough day to…

  • Urban Planning Needs More Women

    As a feminist who loves labeling herself with the word feminist, I get stuck in a lot of frustrating conversations with those who think gender equality means treating women the same as men, or the equally perplexing view, women don't…

  • Section 3: It Doesn’t Have to Be This Way

    Section 3 was a truly creative idea when it was inaugerated in 1968: Let's give low-income residents the first crack at the jobs that public housing generates. Unfortunately, several generations later, the program is better known by its almost universal ineffectiveness…

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    Review: Born on Third Base

    Woody Widrow reviews the United for a Fair Economy (UFE) report Born on Third Base: What the Forbes 400 Really Says About Economic Equality and Opportunity in America. The report, he says: coincided with the release of the Forbes 400, an…

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    Businessweek Cover Points to Us All

    All the criticism that the recent BusinessWeek cover is getting is well deserved. It deserves even more. The juxtaposition with the relatively benign article inside especially makes one wonder why such smart people came up with such a racist illustration. Was…

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    Bending the Arc Toward Justice

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. often said that the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends towards justice. Dr. King had a broad and nuanced vision of what justice meant. We all know about his struggles for…

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    Crossing Neighborhood Boundaries

    Equitable regions are stronger, healthier regions for everyone. This is becoming more and more of a bedrock understanding within our field. This understanding has transformed much of the work of community development, leading us to more collaborations with regional efforts…

  • At Your Own Risk

    Whole Foods Market CEO John Mackey’s piece in The Wall Street Journal, “The Whole Foods Alternative to ObamaCare,” touted his own company’s health insurance policy, offered half-baked, pie-in-the-sky solutions (“make it easier for individuals to make voluntary, tax-deductible donation[s] to…

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    Giving New Meaning to “Green” Transit

    In the US, we tend to think of public transportation as inherently green, which of course it is compared to our addiction to driving. It becomes even more so when old diesel buses are replaced with models running on natural…

  • Commuter Rail�s Promise

    The battle over what sort of transportation projects to include in the economic stimulus package centered around whether to emphasize the same old highway subsidies or to push more progressive transit. But not every smart-growth advocate favors more money for…

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