Subject: Policies

  • Preliminary HUD Budget Shows Carson Lied in His Confirmation Hearing Too

    The Washington Post reported today that a preliminary HUD budget cuts $6 billion—eliminating Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) and the HOME program, and cutting the already inadequate public housing operating and capital funds. (Remember the good old days when we…

  • Time for a Job Guarantee

    In various economic pundit conversations on Twitter, the new target of scorn is Universal Basic Income (UBI). Supporters of UBI (at least those who identify as being more left-leaning) posit it as a solution to the jobless and depressed landscapes…

  • GOP Tax Plan Takes Mortgage Interest Deduction Unfairness Off the Charts

    Let's raise the standard deduction and lower tax rates to give everyone a tax cut!  It should not surprise you that since this is a description of the House GOP tax plan that it's not as good as it sounds.…

  • The Real Social Engineering Ben Carson Needs to Address

    HUD is the nation’s primary enforcer of the Fair Housing Act. This is one obligation Ben Carson will assume if he is confirmed as HUD secretary. But in his defense of Carson, Wall Street Journal columnist James L. Riley points…

  • How CRA Can Promote Integration in Gentrifying Neighborhoods

    Gentrification—the process of neighborhood demographic and economic change in which middle- and upper-income people move into lower-income neighborhoods, increasing home values and rent prices—has intensified in large cities and metropolitan areas across the country. When a neighborhood experiences gentrification, it…

  • The Foreclosure King Ascends to Treasury

    There is considerable unease in the housing and community development world about the future of federal policy, including support for vouchers, fair housing, and other critical policies and programs. While the choice for secretary of the Department of Housing and…

  • No, Housing Policy Really *Could* Get Done Next Year

    Housing didn’t feature prominently in the 2016 presidential campaigns, and while we might wish it had gotten more attention, we may ultimately be glad it wasn’t the focus of hyperbolic campaign promises. Now, with the work of governing ahead, we…

  • Malign Neglect? Urban Policy in the Trump Era

    To paraphrase physicist Niels Bohr, (or maybe it was Yogi Berra), "predicting is difficult, especially when it’s about the future." One would think even more so, looking at this subject, when it is just one of the many issues that…

  • On Clinton, Obama, Trump, and the Failures of Liberal Urban Policy

    In the closing days of the seemingly endless 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, it became increasingly clear to political observers that Hillary Clinton was explicitly adopting a platform of continuity with President Barack Obama’s administration. This interpretation is helpful in understanding…

  • The Costs of “Moving On”

    In his recent New York Times op-ed, American Enterprise Institute president Arthur C. Brooks says declining mobility is a primary cause of the nation’s economic malaise. Among his suggestions, he writes that “we should reform place-based welfare programs to reduce…

  • How to Make Housing Affordable for All the Working Poor

    The headlines tell the story: “Half of all renters can’t afford the rent.” “Renters, get ready to take it on the chin.” “The rent crisis is about to get a lot worse.” Shaun Donovan, Obama’s first secretary of the Department…

  • Government on the Ropes—Nonprofits Step In

    The loss of community development staff working at the City of Flint, Michigan, threatened the existence and continuity of many of its housing programs and services. Through partnerships forged among local partners, HUD, and The Cloudburst Group, Flint found a…

  • Harnessing Immigrant Entrepreneurship for Economic Growth

    Last week’s release of Bread for the World’s new paper on immigrant small businesses was marked by racial tension from unexpected quarters, as audience members and presenters at a joint panel discussion took on the question of who it was…

  • Amidst Congressional Missteps, Housing Opportunities Remain

    Here in Washington, Congress has finally done its primary job: that of funding the government. The process of last-minute scrambling and late-night bargaining is clearly no way to run a government—as members of Congress and their staff become harried, priorities…

  • Ferguson: No One Should Be Surprised

    This op-ed originally appeared in the St. Louis Post Dispatch on October 8, 2014. Recent events in Ferguson constitute the logical outcome of forces spelled out in 1968 by the National Advisory Panel on Civil Disorders, better known as the…

  • 2014 Elections: The Takeaway for Housing and Community Development Policy

    Enterprise Community Partners created this quick yet comprehensive analysis of the implications of the election on housing and community development programs that we here at Shelterforce and Rooflines have found helpful. (Photo credit, Flickr user Carl CC BY-SA 2.0) more

  • Congress Agrees: Collaborative, Comprehensive Care Needed For Rural Vets

    Rural America has a strong history of protecting our country. In fact, as highlighted in a recent report on rural veterans, veterans are more prevalent in rural America, comprising 11.4 percent of the rural population compared to 9.6 percent of…

  • Can We Demolish Our Way to Revitalization?

    While the answer to that question in the title of this piece is obvious, there’s a strong case to be made that a lot of the buildings that make up America’s older cities may have to go, if these cities…

  • Bus Tour Fueled by Immigration Reform

    One bus, four days, seven states, 11 cities, nine Congressional offices visited and 40 people riding a bus to advocate for a better path to citizenship. Those impressive numbers summarize the just-completed “Dream For All Bus Tour” which visited members…

  • {caption}

    Commission Says End Fannie and Freddie, Make a Public Guarantor

    The Bipartisan Policy Center's Housing Commission released its report, Housing America's Future, on housing policy this morning. The 21-member commission, which worked on the report for 16 months, was cochaired by two former HUD secrataries, Mel Martinez and Henry Cisneros,…

  • Next »